Jimmy Eat World

First Fleet Concerts Presents:

Jimmy Eat World

Beach Slang

Thu, May 18, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Wooly's

Des Moines, IA

$32.50 - $35.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

Jimmy Eat World
Jimmy Eat World
Before Jimmy Eat World entered the studio to record their ninth full-length album, Integrity Blues [RCA], the members of the multiplatinum Mesa, AZ rock band did something they’ve never done in over two decades.
“We took a little break,” smiles lead singer and guitarist Jim Adkins.
After a successful 10th anniversary tour revisiting Futures, the musicians briefly went their separate ways at the end of 2014. Adkins released a series of 7” & embarked on his first worldwide solo tour, Lind released an EP and toured with his wife in The Wretched Desert, Linton took up boxing, and Burch opened up CaskWerks Distillery in Arizona.
When the band reconvened in November 2015, they teamed up with producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen [Paramore, M83] and began sifting through ideas.
“I came to a realization,” admits Adkins. “In the break, writing was a little trickier. I
wanted to change things up. So, instead of writing about a problem, I wanted to write about a solution. If you look at your life for what’s going wrong, it won’t be too hard to find things. If you start looking at what you have rather than what you’re missing out on, you come away from things with a much different perspective that’s a lot more grateful and positive. As an album, Integrity Blues is about trying to overcome that personal struggle instead of getting upset with what life could be that it isn’t.”
They recorded in Los Angeles with Meldal-Johnsen, offering a different setting from their usual Arizona digs.
“We became willing to throw away our default responses to everything and search for
the best answers rather than relying on what was familiar or comfortable. When you’re younger and you make music, you do it for discovery. Being in this for a long time, it’s
about throwing out all of your expectations and comforts and seeing what you can do without them.”
With warm production and a powerful upbeat groove, Integrity Blues first single “Sure and Certain” pairs a buzzing guitar hum with an unshakable chant.
“It’s about the idea of having blinders on for what you want to do and achieve,” the frontman explains. “Since you’re so laser focused on what you think you want, you’remissing out on everything around you. It can be a very limiting way to go about life.”
Meanwhile, the gorgeously minimal title track “Integrity Blues” tempers orchestral, cinematic overtones with a stark and striking vocal performance.

“It was a song I wrote on the solo tour,” he recalls. “Sometimes, the idea of walking your
path the best you can feels like lonely work. The only way out is action. Feelings of being in a dark place are actually growth opportunities. It’s emotional jiu-jitsu to shift your perspective into seeing it that way.”
Elsewhere on the record, “Get Right” snaps into an energetic refrain, while “Through” serves up one of the band’s hookiest moments to date.
“You Are Free” flaunts one of the group’s most hummable and heartfelt refrains, serving as another high watermark. “It Matters” illuminates the band’s diverse sonic palette and covers what Adkins describes as “a central theme about the idea that a sense of comfort comes from within and not just external validation.”
“Pass The Baby” builds from a delicate heartbeat-style click into a deliberate and distorted explosion. Near seven-minute closer “Pol Roger” carves out an emotional and
entrancing climax encased in a rapture of guitars and vocals, which according to Adkins, “Felt like the right way to sum everything up.”
Surveying the journey thus far, Adkins maintains the same passion he did on day one, and it continues to fuel Jimmy Eat World. “I’ve wanted to play music since second grade, and here I am playing music. It’s something we’re immensely grateful for. That’s why we don’t take it lightly. We want to be in a constant state of progress. You have to move forward in a way that’s challenging and evolving.” “At the end of the day, you have to be proud of your own work,” he leaves off. “We are.
If you breathe that in and believe it, you’ve won.”
Beach Slang
Beach Slang are a band who have garnered a lot of attention considering that they've only released two 7-inches, 2014's Cheap Thrills On A Dead End Street and its companion Who Would Ever Want Something So Broken? Refreshingly this Philadelphia-based act have built their hype the old-fashioned way, without any gimmicks or marketing teams, which makes sense when you consider that frontman and writer James Alex cut his teeth in the Pennsylvania pop-punk act Weston while drummer JP Flexner and bassist Ed McNulty also play in buzzed about projects such as Ex-Friends and Crybaby. However there's something indefinable about Beach Slang's music that evokes the spirit of punk and juxtaposes it into something that's as brutally honest as it is infectiously catchy.

"When this whole thing started it was like, 'Alright, i'm going to get to hear my sappy little songs played loud and interact with other human beings again,' the admittedly shy Alex says looking back on Beach Slang's existence. "Then one day this really sweet explosion happened and Beach Slang became a thing that mattered to people." As anyone who has seen Beach Slang live can attest, it matters to people a lot including the group's peers like Cursive who hand-selected Beach Slang to open for them on their upcoming headlining tour. "I used to skate with this really sweet girl who would refer to the way I spoke as 'beach slang' and I've never shaken that off," Alex continues. "The really soft parts of your childhood, I suppose, have a way of sticking around. I like that."

That feeling of youth and vulnerability also lie at the core of Beach Slang's music, which is part punk, part pop and all catharsis. It references the ghosts of The Replacements but keeps one foot firmly rooted in the present. It's fun and it's serious. It's sad but it isn't. It's Beach Slang. Enjoy it and look out for the band's debut full-length later this year because they're still just getting started.
Venue Information:
Wooly's
504 E. Locust St,
Des Moines, IA, 50309
http://woolysdm.com/